Branston Water Park River Trent crossing at Walton Rosliston Forestry Centre

Stage 9 National Forest Way: Rosliston & Branston Water Park

The National Forest Way takes walkers on a 75-mile journey through a transforming landscape.

On this 5½-mile stage, the Way takes you through open farmland and the floodplain of the River Trent. You will pass through young woods and open fields between the villages of Rosliston and Walton-on-Trent. You will cross the River Trent, which will be your companion for a while as you enter the flat plains of mineral workings and skylark country.

Rosliston Forestry Centre provides plenty of opportunities to get active or just sit back and relax with a cuppa and a cake.

Please note: There is a temporary footpath closure in place on the public footpath (Public Footpath No 1(c) Branston) between the railway line and the Gate Inn PH at Branston (between sections 19 & 20 on the leaflet). This is due to the construction of a new housing development and there is no official diversion in place. The route leaflets have been updated to show the temporary diversion.

Location Map

Swadlincote Derbyshire

Walk type National Forest Way Stage

Points of Interest

Rosliston Forestry Centre
Rosliston Forestry Centre was the first visitor centre in The National Forest and has a strong environmental education programme well used by schools and other groups. The centre includes waymarked walking and cycle routes, birds of prey demonstrations and sculpture trails.

Walton-on-Trent
This attractive village is an ancient crossing point of the River Trent. It was here that King Edward II crossed the river in pursuit of the disaffected Earl of Lancaster.

River Trent & the Bailey Bridge
The current bridge built in 1974 is the second temporary Bailey bridge to cross the river at this point. The river is an important wildlife habitat: look out for kingfisher, heron and evidence of otters.

Branston Water Park
These restored gravel pits feature one of the largest areas of reedbed in Staffordshire, together with wet woodland, open grassland and wildflower meadows. These valuable habitats attract a wide range of birds, butterflies and other insects.